Tagged with "consciousness"
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Category: B.O.L.E.
Tags: BOLE Activitism Poetry Consciousness The Awakening

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Published on 19 Dec 2014 by Snordster w

Produced by Jared Rosenthal... here: https://vimeo.com/114742469
Poem by Hebert Logerie, here: http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sick-and-mad-of-seeing-so-much-violence-in-our-streets/

_______________________________

Another perfect production voiced by Patrick Willis (Snordster)

SiNeh~

 

Solstice Group Distant Healing Event on Sunday 21 December Tags: Activism Community Consciousness Empowerment The Awakening

Solstice group distant healing event

21 December 2014

Summer Solstice in the South
  Winter Solstice in the North

-All are welcome to participate in this event –

By Edna Spennato

The Earth Heal Geoharmonic Research Project will be hosting a group distant healing event for participants around the world on the Solstice, Sunday 21 December.

The event will start at 17:00 GMT/Universal Time and continue for about 4 hours, ending around 21:00 pm GMT/Universal Time. To check the starting time of this event in your part of the world, please go to this link.

The actual moment of Solstice will be at 23:03 GMT/UTC on 21 December.

All people and animals everywhere in the world are welcome to join us as participants on a donation basis (an amount of your own choice) as an exchange for the work done for you personally during the event. Support from participants and Earth Heal members assists us in our various projects, including ongoing animal rescue work in Brazil and continuing to offer distant healing work on a pro-bono basis to truly disadvantaged people and animals worldwide.

 

The Solstice treatment will include more than 200 participants globally, and will be facilitated in Bahia, Brazil by Edna Spennato, assisted by Amanda Siegruhn in Paarl, South Africa, working together under guidance from the collective Higher Self of the group.

Seven surrogates, in South America, South Africa, the UK and the USA will anchor incoming healing energy during the treatment process and release the energies that are “no longer needed” on behalf of the participants and the planetary morphic field as a whole.

For more info about this event and the experience of participating, please go to this link.

Feedback from participants in our recent Full Moon event of 6 November 2014 can be viewed at this link.

For info on how to register as a participant in the Solstice event, please go to this link.

The participant’s registration form can be viewed at this link.

Exchange and payment details can be viewed at this link.

 
 

Sunlight on Earth, on the day of the winter solstice. The north polar region of Earth is in 24-hour darkness, while the south polar region is in 24-hour daylight. Gif via Wikimedia Commons.

Solstice

[Extract from Earth Sky] The December solstice marks the longest night in Northern Hemisphere and longest day in the Southern Hemisphere.

Day and night sides of Earth at instant of December 2014 solstice:

 

Day and night sides of Earth at the instant of the December 2014 solstice (2014 December 21 at 23:03 Universal Time). Image credit: Earth and Moon Viewer

Day and night sides of Earth at the instant of the December 2014 solstice (2014 December 21 at 23:03 Universal Time). Note that the north polar region of Earth must endure 24 hours of night, while the south polar region gets to bask in 24 hours of daylight. Image credit: Earth and Moon Viewer

This special day is coming up on Sunday, December 21 at 23:03 UTC (5:03 p.m. CST). An interesting fact about the coming solstice is that it occurs within about two-and-a-half hours of a new moon. No matter where you live on Earth’s globe, a solstice is your signal to celebrate. In the Northern Hemisphere, the December solstice marks the longest night and shortest day of the year. Meanwhile, on the day of the December solstice, the Southern Hemisphere has its longest day and shortest night.

When is the solstice where I live? The solstice happens at the same instant for all of us, everywhere on Earth. In 2014, the December solstice comes on December 21 at 5:03 p.m. CST. That’s 23:03 Universal Time. It’s when the sun on our sky’s dome reaches its farthest southward point for the year. At this solstice, the Northern Hemisphere has its shortest day and longest night of the year.

To find the time in your location, you have to translate to your time zone. Click here to translate Universal Time to your local time.


Earth has seasons because our world is tilted on its axis with respect to our orbit around the sun. Image via NASA.

General info about the upcoming Solstice event

During the treatment process, each participant will receive healing on an individual level and as being part of the work done for the group of participants as a whole, and will also be anchoring the planetary healing energies in their part of the world, releasing disharmonic energy and receiving healing energy on a collective level.

We use a cutting-edge distant healing method known as Synchronization Harmonics, and for those who have never before experienced distant healing work, this is the ideal opportunity.

After each healing event, feedback and detailed reports about what came up during the treatment process for the group, as well as for the collective consciousness on a planetary level, are mailed to participants.

First-time participants should e-mail their details and pics to us at earthhealadmin [at] gmail [dot] com as soon as possible, and no later than 11 pm GMT/UTC on Saturday, 20 December.

More Here>>

 

8 Ways Magic Mushrooms Explain the Santa Story
Category: Esoterica
Tags: Christmas consciousness entheogens Inspiration

Douglas Main, Live Science
Waking Times

Santa and his bag of… magic mushrooms?

The story of Santa and his flying reindeer can be traced to an unlikely source: hallucinogenic or “magic” mushrooms, according to one theory.

“Santa is a modern counterpart of a shaman, who consumed mind-altering plants and fungi to commune with the spirit world,” said John Rush, an anthropologist and instructor at Sierra College in Rocklin, Calif.

Here are eight ways that hallucinogenic mushrooms explain the story of Santa and his reindeer.

1. Arctic shamans gave out mushrooms on the winter solstice.

According to the theory, the legend of Santa derives from shamans in the Siberian and Arctic regions who dropped into locals’ teepeelike homes with a bag full of hallucinogenic mushrooms as presents in late December, Rush said.

“As the story goes, up until a few hundred years ago, these practicing shamans or priests connected to the older traditions would collect Amanita muscaria (the Holy Mushroom), dry them and then give them as gifts on the winter solstice,” Rush told LiveScience in an email. “Because snow is usually blocking doors, there was an opening in the roof through which people entered and exited, thus the chimney story.”

2. Mushrooms, like gifts, are found beneath pine trees.

 

That’s just one of the symbolic connections between the Amanita muscaria mushroom and the iconography of Christmas, according to several historians and ethnomycologists, or people who study fungi’s influence on human societies. Of course, not all scientists agree that the Santa story is tied to a hallucinogen. [Trippy Tales: History of Magic Mushrooms & Other Hallucinogens]

In his book “Mushrooms and Mankind” (The Book Tree, 2003) the late author James Arthur points out that Amanita muscaria, also known as fly agaric, lives throughout the Northern Hemisphere under conifers and birch trees, with which the fungi — which are deep red with white flecks — have a symbiotic relationship. This partially explains the practice of the Christmas tree, and the placement of bright red-and-white presents underneath it, which look like Amanita mushrooms, he wrote.

“Why do people bring pine trees into their houses at the winter solstice, placing brightly colored (red-and-white) packages under their boughs, as gifts to show their love for each other …?” he wrote. “It is because, underneath the pine bough is the exact location where one would find this ‘Most Sacred’ substance, the Amanita muscaria, in the wild.” (Note: Do not eat these mushrooms, as they can be poisonous.)

pine-tree

3. Reindeer were shaman “spirit animals.”

Reindeer are common in Siberia and northern Europe, and seek out these hallucinogenic fungi, as the area’s human inhabitants have also been known to do. Donald Pfister, a Harvard University biologist who studies fungi, suggests that Siberian tribesmen who ingested fly agaric may have hallucinated that the grazing reindeer were flying.

“At first glance, one thinks it’s ridiculous, but it’s not,” said Carl Ruck, a professor of classics at Boston University. “Whoever heard of reindeer flying? I think it’s becoming general knowledge that Santa is taking a ‘trip’ with his reindeer.” [6 Surprising Facts About Reindeer]

Christmas night. Santa and his reindeers riding against moon Pin It Were Santa and his reindeer on a magic mushroom-induced trip?
Credit: Nomad_Soul | ShutterstockView full size image
“Amongst the Siberian shamans, you have an animal spirit you can journey with in your vision quest,” Ruck continued. “And reindeer are common and familiar to people in eastern Siberia.”

shaman-2-691x10244. Shamans dressed like … Santa Claus.

These shamans “also have a tradition of dressing up like the [mushroom] … they dress up in red suits with white spots,” Ruck said.

5. Mushrooms abound in Christmas iconography.

Tree ornaments shaped like Amanita mushrooms and other depictions of the fungi are also prevalent in Christmas decorations throughout the world, particularly in Scandinavia and northern Europe, Pfister pointed out. That said, Pfister made it clear that the connection between modern-day Christmas and the ancestral practice of eating mushrooms is a coincidence, and he doesn’t know about any direct link. [5 Surprising Facts About Christmas]

6. Rudolph’s nose resembles a bright-red mushroom.

Ruck points to Rudolph as another example of the mushroom imagery resurfacing: His nose looks exactly like a red mushroom. “It’s amazing that a reindeer with a red-mushroom nose is at the head, leading the others,” he said.

Many of these traditions were merged or projected upon St. Nicholas, a fourth-century saint known for his generosity, as the story goes.

There is little debate about the consumption of mushrooms by Arctic and Siberian tribespeople and shamans, but the connection to Christmas traditions is more tenuous, or “mysterious,” as Ruck put it.

7. “A Visit from St. Nicholas” may have borrowed from shaman rituals.

Many of the modern details of the modern-day American Santa Claus come from the 1823 poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas” (which later became famous as “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas”). The poem is credited to Clement Clarke Moore, an aristocratic academic who lived in New York City.

The origins of Moore’s vision are unclear, although Arthur, Rush and Ruck all think the poet probably drew from northern European motifs that derive from Siberian or Arctic shamanic traditions. At the very least, Arthur wrote, Santa’s sleigh and reindeer are probably references to various related northern European mythology. For example, the Norse god Thor (known in German as Donner) flew in a chariot drawn by two goats, which have been replaced in the modern retelling by Santa’s reindeer, Arthur wrote.

Reindeer, which aren’t usually known to fly. Pin It Reindeer, which aren’t usually known to fly.

Other historians were unaware of a connection between Santa and shamans or magic mushrooms, including Stephen Nissenbaum, who wrote a book about the origins of Christmas traditions, and Penne Restad, of the University of Texas at Austin, both of whom were contacted by LiveScience.

8. Santa is from the Arctic.

One historian, Ronald Hutton, told NPR that the theory of a mushroom-Santa connection is flawed. “If you look at the evidence of Siberian shamanism, which I’ve done,” Hutton said, “you find that shamans didn’t travel by sleigh, didn’t usually deal with reindeer spirits, very rarely took the mushrooms to get trances, didn’t have red-and-white clothes.”

But Rush and Ruck disagree, saying shamans did deal with reindeer spirits and the ingestion of mushrooms is well documented. Siberian shamans did wear red deer pelts, but the coloring of Santa’s garb is mainly meant to mirror the coloring of Amanita mushrooms, Rush added. As for sleighs, the point isn’t the exact mode of travel, but that the “trip” involves transportation to a different, celestial realm, Rush said. Sometimes people would also drink the urine of the shaman or the reindeer, as the hallucinogenic compounds are excreted this way, without some of the harmful chemicals present in the fungi (which are broken down by the shaman or the reindeer), Rush said.

“People who know about shamanism accept this story,” Ruck said. “Is there any other reason that Santa lives in the North Pole? It is a tradition that can be traced back to Siberia.”

About the Author

Email Douglas Main or follow him on Twitter or Google+. Follow us @LiveScience, Facebook or Google+. Article originally on LiveScience.

 

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