Tagged with "health"
Amazing Garden Transformation with the No-dig Approach Tags: Health Food Gardening

Amazing Garden Transformation with the No-dig Approach

Video - Growing your own food does not have to be as difficult as you’re let to believe. Here’s an example of turning an uncultivated plot of land into an abundant garden using the no-dig approach, all within a few months.

Video

 

The Many Benefits Of Reconnecting With Nature
Category: INSPIRATIONS
Tags: Consciousness Empowerment Health Inspiration

by Susan Patterson

There is something incredibly therapeutic about a walk on the beach, a stroll through the woods or a climb to the top of a mountain. With all senses engaging the fresh air, sunshine and natural beauty of nature, both the mind and body become refreshed. These “good feelings” that come with being outside in nature have been the subject of many a study over the years. Research acknowledges these “good feelings” and has found that time spent in nature does have a variety of positive impacts including a reduction in depression and aggressiveness.In addition, scientific evidence agrees that tense feelings decrease, and we are better able to handle stress and frustration in life when it comes our way if we are connected to nature. Professionals now refer to time spent outdoors as eco-therapy simply because it is so beneficial.

Walking Outdoors

According to one 2007 study done in the Untied Kingdom, something as simple as walking in the park can reduce depression. The study had one group walk in a mall and another group walk outside. Of the group that walked outside, 71% indicated that they had a reduction in depression while 22% of those who walked inside felt as if their depression had increased. Feelings of self-esteem were increased in 90 percent of those who walked in the park, and tension was reduced by 71 percent in this group, as well. The mall walking group reported only a 50 percent decline in tension and a 44 percent increase in self esteem. While walking anytime is a good habit, it appears, from this study, that walking outdoors, also known as forest bathing, has enhanced benefits.

Viewing Nature

Even just viewing nature has been found to have a positive impact. A 2009 study from the University of Rochester found that when study groups were exposed to nature pictures they chose to be connected to their community over gaining wealth and fame as a life aspiration. Participants who viewed urban photos chose wealth and fame first. In the same study, researchers found that people who were exposed to nature pictures were more likely, than those exposed to city scenes, to share money with others.

Conservation is Healthy

Science Daily reported on a study done in 2005 that found people who were actively involved in conservation projects reaped substantial health benefits from their participation. These benefits included a greater sense of connectedness, feelings of wellbeing and reduction of social isolation. Time spent outdoors doing good appears to be a win-win situation.

‘Nature Deficit Disorder’

Richard Louv created the term “Nature Deficit Disorder” in his book Last Child in the Woods. Louv argues that kids are not spending nearly enough time outdoors today, and in turn are suffering from a number of negative effects from lack of time in nature. Amongst these negative effects are attention difficulties, obesity, depression, and diminished use of senses. Louv’s claims support research finding that detachment from nature has far reaching negative physiological effects. Parents are encouraged to spend time with their children in nature and to take part in outdoor recreational activities as often as possible. Building healthy habits young appears to be a pursuit well worth undertaking.

 

Record US Farmers Switching To Non-GMO Crops In 2015
Category: ACTIVITISM
Tags: Activism Big Agra GMO food Health News

Christina Sarich

Natural Society

“Non-GMO is More Profitable.”

This is the rising sentiment among farmers of the US as a confluence of factors urges them to become pro-organic. From falling GMO grain prices to a rising tide of public distrust of genetically modified ingredients, failing GMO traits, higher GMO seed prices, and the premium prices that people willingly pay for quality food over toxic junk, the conventional farmer is changing his tune when it comes to Big Ag practices.

Even if profit is the cornerstone on which this change is based, it is still telling. After all, experts project over $35 billion in sales for organic, non-GMO foods in 2015, and as GMO corn, soy and other GM grain prices rise, along with the costs to grow them (associated with more pesticide and herbicide use to control super weeds, for example) farmers are looking past the GMO propaganda which promised higher yields and more cash for farmers who grew their poison crops.

This phenomenon is explained clearly in  “The Genetic Engineering of Food and the Failure of Science” (full text available for download here) published in The International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food.

Gilbert Hostetler, president of Illinois-based Prairie Hybrids commented:

 

“Our non-GMO seed sales are significantly higher than last year.”

Mac Ehrhardt, president of Minnesota-based Albert Lea Seed reports that he is selling more conventional (he describes conventional corn as non-GMO) corn seed by the end of November than he did all of last year. He says that farmers are turning to non-GMO to cut costs and to earn more money for their non-GMO yields.

Ehrhardt says:

 “There is a continued increased demand for non-GMO.”

His observations are corroborated by Wayne Hoener, vice president of sales for eMerge, an Iowa-based seed company, as well as Tim Daley, an agronomist at Stonebridge, Ltd., an Iowa-based buyer of non-GMO soybeans who are also seeing a marked demand for non-GMO seed by farmers.

Daley says:

“Some companies have seen a 50 percent increase in sales of non GMO seed, and some have said they’ve sold more non-GMO seed this year than in the last five.”

Oddly, Morrie Bryant, senior marketing manager at Pioneer Hi-Bred, which sells non-GMO corn and soybean seeds but sells more GMO seeds says he doesn’t see a big difference.

 “On (non-GMO) corn, we’ve got a slight increase on sales over last year,” he says. “Non-GMO has emerged as the new niche. It’s about 4-5 percent of total corn production.”

If consumer demand for organic is any indication, farmers would be smart to step up their organic seed purchasing, and ditch Monsanto, Dow and Syngenta seeds completely.

MORE HERE>>

 

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