SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Instead Of Being Buried, People Are Doing THIS Instead Tags: remains family death diamonds

One way to keep a loving family memberclose to you, it could change the whole concept of someone stealing your wife.
You have a lot of options as a dead person. Burial and cremation are popular ones. You can opt for a “green” burial, where the body is not embalmed and buried in a biodegradable container. You could also have a “sky burial,” where you’re left out as a snack for scavenging birds. (Really. This is a thing. Look it up.)

One Swiss company is taking a more glamorous approach to human remains. Talk about saving space! 

A cut and polished diamond. The blue color comes from the amount of boron present in the ashes.
A cut and polished diamond. The blue color comes from the amount of boron present in the ashes.

Algordanza provides a service where the cremated remains of a loved one convert into adiamond. The diamond can then be used in jewelry or kept in a collection.

How is this done? First, the carbon is extracted from the cremated remains. The human body is about 18% carbon, and about 2% of that remains after the cremation process. This is the carbon Algodanza uses to make their diamonds, and filters out of the other materials via a chemical process. The carbon is heated and turned into graphite, the material found in pencils.

These are the machines that exert pressure onto the graphite, mechanically transforming it into a diamond
Picking up a new diamond.

The graphite is heated to 2,700 degrees Fahrenheit and subjected to as many as 870,000 pounds of pressure per square inch. The result of this process, which mimics a process deep in the Earth, is a diamond that ranges from white to dark blue in color. The color variation depends on the amount of the element boron in the ashes. The diamond is cut and polished, and many opt to have it set in a ring or another piece of jewelry to keep their deceased loved ones close.

completed diamond.
A memorial diamond set into a ring.

Turning someone’s ashes into a diamond is not a cheap process, but it’s comparable with the cost of an average funeral. This process is about $4,500 (USD), not counting the prior cremation. A burial can run almost $10,000 in total.

The process is pretty fascinating on a scientific level, when you consider that what was once a human is now a beautiful gem. I still don’t know how I’d feel about someone wearing my remains everywhere, but it sounds better than the alternatives.

Credits: ViralNova
 
SOURCE
37 Million Bees Found Dead After Planting Large GMO Corn Field Tags: GMO Monsanto toxins pesticide to cause pestilence Pollination foods evil corn bees

Millions of bees dropped dead after GMO corn was planted few weeks ago in Ontario, Canada. The local bee keeper, Dave Schuit who produces honey in Elmwood lost about 37 million bees which are about 600 hives.

“Once the corn started to get planted our bees died by the millions,” Schuit said. While many bee keepers blame neonicotinoids, or “neonics.” for colony collapse of bees and many countries in EU have banned neonicotinoid class of pesticides, the US Department of Agriculture fails to ban insecticides known as neonicotinoids, manufactured by Bayer CropScience Inc.

Two of Bayer’s best-selling pesticides, Imidacloprid and Clothianidin, are known to get into pollen and nectar, and can damage beneficial insects such as bees. The marketing of these drugs also coincided with the occurrence of large-scale bee deaths in many European countries and the United States.

Nathan Carey another local farmer says that this spring he noticed that there were not enough bees on his farm and he believes that there is a strong correlation between the disappearance of bees and insecticide use.

In the past, many scientists have struggled to find the exact cause of the massive die-offs, a phenomenon they refer to as “colony collapse disorder” (CCD). In the United States, for seven consecutive years, honeybees are in terminal decline.

US scientists have found 121 different pesticides in samples of bees, wax and pollen, lending credence to the notion that pesticides are a key problem. “We believe that some subtle interactions between nutrition, pesticide exposure and other stressors are converging to kill colonies,” said Jeffery Pettis, of the ARS’s bee research laboratory.

The collapse in the global honeybee population is a major threat to crops. It is estimated that a third of everything we eat depends upon honeybee pollination, which means that bees contribute over 30 billion to the global economy.

A new study published in the Journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences revealed that neonicotinoid pesticides kill honeybees by damaging their immune system and making them unable to fight diseases and bacteria.

After reporting large losses of bees after exposure to Imidacloprid, banned it for use on corn and sunflowers, despite protests by Bayer. In another smart move, France also rejected Bayer’s application for Clothianidin, and other countries, such as Italy, have banned certain neonicotinoids as well.

After record-breaking honeybee deaths in the UK, the European Union has banned multiple pesticides, including neonicotinoid pesticides.

You have our permission to reprint this article via creative commons license if you attribute us with a live backlink to this article. - Organic Health

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I’m terrified of my new TV: Why I’m scared to turn this thing on — and you’d be, too Tags: TV smart television surveillance Facial recognition technology 1984 Orwellian data mining

From facial recognition to personal data collection, this thing is downright scary -- and so are the implications

I'm terrified of my new TV: Why I'm scared to turn this thing on -- and you'd be, too

(Credit: cobalt88 via Shutterstock)

I just bought a new TV. The old one had a good run, but after the volume got stuck on 63, I decided it was time to replace it. I am now the owner of a new “smart” TV, which promises to deliver streaming multimedia content, games, apps, social media and Internet browsing. Oh, and TV too.

The only problem is that I’m now afraid to use it. You would be too — if you read through the 46-page privacy policy.

The amount of data this thing collects is staggering. It logs where, when, how and for how long you use the TV. It sets tracking cookies and beacons designed to detect “when you have viewed particular content or a particular email message.” It records “the apps you use, the websites you visit, and how you interact with content.” It ignores “do-not-track” requests as a considered matter of policy.

It also has a built-in camera — with facial recognition. The purpose is to provide “gesture control” for the TV and enable you to log in to a personalized account using your face. On the upside, the images are saved on the TV instead of uploaded to a corporate server. On the downside, the Internet connection makes the whole TV vulnerable to hackers who have demonstrated the ability to take complete control of the machine.

More troubling is the microphone. The TV boasts a “voice recognition” feature that allows viewers to control the screen with voice commands. But the service comes with a rather ominous warning: “Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party.” Got that? Don’t say personal or sensitive stuff in front of the TV.

You may not be watching, but the telescreen is listening.

I do not doubt that this data is important to providing customized content and convenience, but it is also incredibly personal, constitutionally protected information that should not be for sale to advertisers and should require a warrant for law enforcement to access.

Unfortunately, current law affords little privacy protection to so-called “third party records,” including email, telephone records, and data stored in “the cloud.” Much of the data captured and transmitted by my new TV would likely fall into this category. Although one federal court of appeals has found this rule unconstitutional with respect to email, the principle remains a bedrock of modern electronic surveillance.

 

According to retired Gen. David Petraeus, former head of the CIA, Internet-enabled “smart” devices can be exploited to reveal a wealth of personal data. “Items of interest will be located, identified, monitored, and remotely controlled through technologies such as radio-frequency identification, sensor networks, tiny embedded servers, and energy harvester,” he reportedly told a venture capital firm in 2012. “We’ll spy on you through your dishwasher,” read one headline. Indeed, as the “Internet of Things” matures, household appliances and physical objects will become more networked. Your ceiling lights, thermostat and washing machine — even your socks — may be wired to interact online. The FBI will not have to bug your living room; you will do it yourself.

Of course, there is always the “dumb” option. Users may have the ability to disable data collection, but it comes at a cost. The device will not function properly or allow the use of its high-tech features. This leaves consumers with an unacceptable choice between keeping up with technology and retaining their personal privacy.

We should not have to channel surf worried that the TV is recording our behavior for the benefit of advertisers and police. Companies need to become more mindful of consumer privacy when deciding whether to collect personal data. And law enforcement should most certainly be required to get a warrant before accessing it.

In the meantime, I’ll be in the market for a new tinfoil hat and cone of silence.

Michael Price is counsel in the Liberty and National Security Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law.

 
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